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  • The marriage question you’ve always wanted to ask

    This is the marriage question I would get every single day, if people said what was really on their minds.

    "How can I be happily married without really trying?"

    It depends, what do you mean by "really"?

    Given the choice between doing very little to improve their marriage, and doing a lot to improve their marriage, most spouses (husbands) will usually give the same answer, "Is this going to get back to my wife?"

    Based on that, here is the way to improve your relationship without hardly trying.

    Warning: this answer involves no drugs, illegal substances or physical violence, yet it's amazingly effective.

    Read more...
  • Why can

    “I have no problems” He replied.

    Because of his physical condition he was surrounded by a team of people whose only job was to ensure his happiness. The only thing he could do to live a little dangerously was to not wear a seat-belt, which I am sorry to say, was the very thing that killed him.

    The picture on the right is Steph Davis. She’s doing what is called “Free Climbing” or “Free Soloing.” The free doesn’t refer to the cost, it refers to the fact she doesn’t use ropes!

    You might be tempted to think it’s crazy, but it’s no different than golf. It’s easy to get to the top with a helicopter, it’s also easy to get the little white ball in the ridiculously small hole. But not if you only use a club.

    We don’t want “easy” because “easy” does not make us happy. It makes monkeys happy, but it does nothing for us. In fact, as soon as we reach any stage of equilibrium we will immediately seek a new path of danger.

    How many people in the 17th century do you think tried to climb vertical mountains? I mean, it’s not like you need any special equipment to climb a mountain, without special equipment.

    Yes, you’ve guessed it, none. Why?

    Because they were too busy staving off the black plague or hoping their wives didn’t die in child-birth, or the Russians didn’t invade, or countless other constant and real threats they lived with daily. One would think, and most people did, that when we rid the world of all the existential threats we would achieve peace, tranquility and happiness.

    How’s that peace and tranquility working for you?

    If we don’t have real threats, we commission them.

    Think about the entertainment and news we surround ourselves with. It’s all stories of problems and disasters. We need to surround ourselves with conflict. The bigger the disaster the more prominent the headline. Why? Because we need the excitement of problems to make us feel alive. In fact, it’s so natural to us, we don’t think it’s odd. But it is odd, relative to the rest of creation, animals just don’t try and make their lives more difficult. They aren’t looking for problems, but we are.

    The problem is, that’s what our kids do too!

    Click Here to Continue...  

     

  • Parenting a Teenager, part 2

     
    Or what I like to call "teenaging," but is more commonly known by the acronym: MKADMC.
     
    My Kids Are Driving Me Crazy!
     
    Teenaging is the (often) painful and slow process of training parents in how to raise teenagers.
     
    To call raising a teenager "parenting" is like calling bungee jumping “skipping.”
     
    Teenaging officially begins at around 11 or 12.  However, cases of "teenage-itis" have been known to break out in children as young as 9 or 10, and I can testify to the fact that some of my kids (as young as 6 or 7) broke out with the same symptoms as my 17-year-old.
     
    Don't worry, that's what single-malt scotch was invented for.
     
    If you are just embarking on the teenaging years, then the vast majority of the advice you’ve read about “parenting” is about as useful as a retirement plan at Lehman Brothers. 
     
    Rule 2 of Teenaging: Change your definition of winning.

    Read more...

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